wassertanzen13

Random stuff, stuff I like, blog improvement stuff. The usual...

Thursday, August 31, 2006

check it out

Wednesday, August 30, 2006

more pics of WTC 7

Yeah, yeah, more smoke. You know, actually smoke means an oxygen poor fire. Means it's not burning as hot as it could be. Lots of smoke doesn't mean a really hot fire that can melt (or weaken) steel to bring a building down. Oh, and how come the east penthouse fell first, when all the damage we've seen so far indicates the southwest corner was the biggest problem? Hmm?


Debunking Debunking 911myths.com

Debunking 911 myths has an exclusive essay with a new picture showing the major damage to the south face of WTC 7. Check out an archived view of their page here

I've added some black lines and blown it up a bit in an attempt to show the camera angle and determine where the shot was taken from and what it actually shows. The Verizon building (far left) has 9 floors of windows above ground story archways before the wedding cake tier effect starts on the next level up as you can see from the second to last picture (top left building, click on the photo to see a larger version (which can be further enlarged)). Therefore, we can conclude that the bottom horizontal line which I've drawn is roughly 2 stories up from ground level. WTC 7 (or smoke, as the case may be)starts to become more visible at approximately the 4th floor. Around the 5th and sixth floors we begin to see actual south facing side of WTC 7 with damage (below that level, I think mostly we see rubble, smoke and damage to the west side of WTC 7). However, because of the severe foreshortening of the south face of WTC 7 (which I've attempted to illustrate with lines drawn from other buildings) it is difficult to tell the extent of the damage to the south side of WTC 7, except that we can probably safely assume that we are seeing the damage to the lower floors of the southwest corner, which we already knew were damaged. See the NYPD photo for the damage down to about the 10th or 11th floor. Now we have a picture of the damage to the southwest corner of WTC 7 which shows us another 5 floors or so, and a bit of the south side of the building. Yay, I guess. The vertical line which I've drawn midway up on WTC 6 (far right) is presumably the roofline of some building, though I'm not quite sure which one.. Obviously, quite a bit of what we see below that line is likely to be various floors of WTC 7 but most of that area is rather vague to say the least. Based on my drawn lines and the parallel lines which intersect, I'm going to say that that picture was probably taken from approximately the position of the firefighter on the far right of picture # 3, or perhaps slightly to the right. That's an approximation only. Once again, we have yet another photograph with a camera angle which seems almost (or perhaps entirely) designed to exaggerate whatever damage was on the south face of WTC 7. I'm still waiting to see that 20 story scoop out of 1/3 of the south face picture, folks. Oh, also, lately the last photo and the accompanying video have been making the rounds. I have just one word for you: solarium. Glass does break in the presence of flying concrete and steel, or so I've heard, at any rate.








Tuesday, August 29, 2006

CJCSI 3125.01 (August 3, 2001) Military Assistance to Domestic Consequence Management Operations in Response to a CBRNE (copied from lsu.edu cache)




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CJCSI 3125.01, August 3, 2001, Military Assistance to Domestic Consequence Management Operations in Response to a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, or High-Yield Explosive Situation




REFERENCES: The references listed in Enclosure H are pertinent to the implementation of this policy.



1. Purpose



a. This instruction provides operational and policy guidance and instructions for US military forces supporting domestic consequence management (CM) operations to prepare for and respond to the effects of a threatened or actual chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, or high-yield explosives (CBRNE) situation. Domestic CBRNE CM support encompasses both deliberate and inadvertent CBRNE situations including terrorism, acts of aggression, industrial accidents, and acts of nature. Domestic CBRNE CM may be conducted by US military forces under immediate response authority and in support of the designated lead federal agency (LFA).


b. Domestic CM operations are those conducted in the continental United States (CONUS) (including the District of Columbia), Alaska, Hawaii, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Two former trust territories (but now independent countries) are also deemed eligible for assistance under the Compact of Free Association -- the Republic of the Marshall Islands (until 21 October 2001) and the Federated States of Micronesia (until 3 November 2001).



c. This instruction does not apply to foreign CM operations. CJCSI 3214.01, “Military Support to Foreign Consequence Management Operations,” dated 30 June 1998, provides guidance for the planning and conduct of foreign CM operations.

2. Cancellation. CJCS CONPLAN 0400, Annex T, Appendix 2, is canceled.



3. Applicability. This instruction provides guidance the CINCs, especially the three geographic CINCs with domestic CBRNE CM responsibilities (USCINCJFCOM, USCINCPAC, and USCINCSO), Services, and DOD combat support agencies. It is provided for information and coordination to the Secretary of Defense and the appropriate US Government (USG) departments and agencies.



4. Objectives



a. Establish a CJCSI to complement and augment federal plans to execute a cohesive federal response to a domestic CBRNE CM situation.



b. Establish the charter for CJCS CONPLAN 0500 describing operational and policy guidance to facilitate a rapid DOD response for a potential or actual domestic CBRNE CM situation.



c. Provide information to the federal departments and agencies and the Department of Defense, and CJCS operational and policy guidance to the CINCs and Services concerning DOD support to the LFA during a domestic CBRNE CM situation.



5. Policy



a. Authority. External policy documents that provide guidance and authority for DOD assistance to domestic CBRNE CM operations are presented in Enclosure C. The Secretary of Defense issued the following internal policy memorandums:



(1) On 9 May 2001, the Secretary of Defense placed the policy oversight responsibility for all domestic CBRNE CM activities under the ASD(SO/LIC).



(2) On 1 April 2000, the Secretary of Defense recalled the Executive Agency for domestic CBRNE CM from the Secretary of Army. The Secretary of Defense retains CBRNE CM authority.



(3) On 10 August 2000, the Secretary of Defense determined that certain CBRNE situations may be qualitatively and quantitatively different than other situations, and DOD response might require special management procedures and channels. The Deputy Secretary of Defense has the responsibility to determine whether or not the CBRNE situation warrants special management. If so, the Joint Staff will translate Secretary of Defense’s decision into military orders for those CBRNE events, under the oversight of the ASD(SO/LIC). If not, the Secretary of the Army will exercise authority as the DOD Executive Agent through normal Director of Military Support (DOMS) military support to civil authorities (MSCA) procedures.



b. Background



(1) Presidential Decision Directive (PDD)-39 and PDD-62 directed measures to strengthen capabilities to prevent and manage the consequences of terrorist use of a CBRNE device, designated the lead agencies’ responsibilities, and established interagency groups to coordinate policies and programs. These PDDs validated and reaffirmed the overall LFA responsibility of the Department of Justice (DOJ), acting through the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The FBI is also the lead agency for crisis management, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is the domestic lead agency for CM.



(2) The Secretary of Defense has issued policy documents (references k, l and m), assigned missions (reference j), and directed structural changes (references j and k). More specifically, the Secretary:



(a) Directed USCINCJFCOM to establish a standing Joint Task Force-Civilian Support (JTF-CS), a headquarters element subordinate to USCINCJFCOM, to plan for and integrate DOD’s support to the LFA responsible for domestic CBRNE CM. Directed that reporting for the JTF-CS be through the CINC and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.



(b) Directed implementation of congressional direction to create Weapons of Mass Destruction-Civil Support Teams (WMD-CSTs) resident in the National Guard and assigned to the governors for domestic CBRNE CM response.



(c) Assigned USJFCOM the mission to provide military assistance to civilian authorities (MACA) for CM of domestic CBRNE situations and to support other CINCs’ CBRNE CM efforts.



c. Mission Guidance for DOD Forces for Domestic CBRNE CM



(1) Immediate Response. Consistent with DOD Directives, when imminently serious conditions resulting from any civil emergency or attack require immediate action, local military commanders and responsible officials of other DOD components may take such actions as may be necessary to save lives, prevent human suffering, or mitigate great property damage. When such conditions exist and time does not permit prior approval from higher headquarters, commanders or officials acting under this Immediate Response Authority may take necessary action to respond to requests of civil authorities. They must also advise the DOD Executive Agent through command channels, by the most expeditious means available, and seek approval or additional authorizations as needed.



(2) DOD Mission Statement. When directed by the Secretary of Defense, DOD forces will prepare for and conduct CM operations in support of the LFA to mitigate the effects of CBRNE situations in the United States, its territories, and possessions.



(3) USJFCOM Mission Guidance. When directed by the Secretary of Defense, USCINCJFCOM deploys military resources and forces, and conducts military support operations to assist federal, state, and local authorities in responding to a natural or manmade CBRNE situation within the 48 contiguous states and the District of Columbia.



(a) JTF-CS Mission Guidance. JTF-CS, when directed, will conduct CM operations in support of the designated LFA in response to a CBRNE incident or accident in CONUS, Alaska, Hawaii, US territories, and possessions. The JTF-CS will establish command and control of designated DOD forces and provide military assistance to civil authorities to save lives, prevent injury, and provide temporary critical life support.



(4) USPACOM Mission Guidance. When directed by the Secretary of Defense, USCINCPAC deploys military resources and forces and conducts military support operations to assist federal, state, and local authorities in responding to a natural or manmade CBRNE situation within the US states, territories, and possessions within its area of responsibility (AOR).



(5) USSOUTHCOM Mission Guidance. When directed by the Secretary of Defense, USCINCSO deploys military resources and forces and conducts military support operations to assist federal, state, and local authorities in responding to a natural or manmade CBRNE situation within the US territories and possessions within its AOR.



d. Command of DOD Forces



(1) Preevent Operations. Designated CINCs are responsible for the conduct of military operations within their assigned AOR or as designated by the Secretary of Defense.

(2) Response Operations. In response to an LFA request and upon NCA approval, the Secretary of Defense will designate the appropriate CINC and command relationship for each specific domestic CBRNE CM operation. In CONUS-based situations, USJFCOM will be the supported CINC. For states, territories, possessions, and commonwealths outside of CONUS, either USCINCPAC or USCINCSO will be the supported CINC. DOD will always be in support of the LFA during domestic CBRNE CM operations. DOD forces will remain under military command and control and the chain of command will remain with the geographic CINC.



(3) DOD Installations and Bases Operations. If a CBRNE situation, which appears to be an intentional incident, occurs on a domestic DOD base or installation, the base commander will notify the FBI Field Office as soon as possible. The base commander will request and coordinate support through higher headquarters and/or the supported CINC as required. The base commander has the authority and responsibility to notify state and local officials of the CBRNE situation when it poses a potential threat outside the installation and may make recommendations to state and local officials on actions that might be taken to protect the public. Installation/base commanders will immediately report any CBRNE situation through military channels in order to inform the CJCS who may recommend to the SECDEF to request assistance from other federal agencies. The FRP states: “If an emergency involves an area or facility for which the Federal Government exercises exclusive or primary responsibility and authority, the President may unilaterally direct the provision of emergency assistance under the Stafford Act. The Governor of the affected state will be consulted if possible.” With deliberate events, whether the incident occurs on or off military installations, DOJ/FBI is the overall LFA, as well as the lead agency for crisis management, and FEMA is the lead agency for CM. Although the base commander maintains overall command over the installation, the FBI has command and authority as it relates to the CBRNE situation. State and local officials can assist the base commander through mutual aid agreements.


(4) Control of National Guard Forces. Generally, short of a Presidential Reserve Call-Up (PRC) or mobilization, Army and Air National Guard forces remain under the control of their respective governor. Under 32 USC authority or state active duty status, the Adjutant General in each state may task organize National Guard units and exercise command and control over National Guard forces and resources to support the state's emergency response plan. If ordered to active duty, under 10 USC, National Guard units fall under the command and control of the designated federal military headquarters and conduct CM operations as part of the supported CINC's efforts.



6. Definitions. Definitions are contained in the Glossary.



7. Considerations. Considerations for CBRNE CM operations are contained in Enclosure F.



8. Roles and Responsibilities. DOD roles and responsibilities are found in Enclosure A. Interagency roles and responsibilities are found in Enclosure B.



9. Procedures. Specific DOD procedures are found in Enclosures D
and E.



10. Interagency Coordination



a. The National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counterterrorism chairs assistant secretary/flag rank groups to coordinate policies and programs and reviews ongoing situations relating to WMD. Two of the groups are the Counterterrorism and Security Group (CSG) and the Preparedness and Weapons of Mass Destruction (PWMD) Group. In accordance with the Federal Reserve Plan (FRP), FEMA chairs the Catastrophic Disaster Response Group (CDRG) to coordinate planning, operations, and exercises for domestic CM, including CBRNE. DOD domestic CBRNE CM planning, operations, and exercises must be thoroughly coordinated within the USG Interagency Community.



b. The ASD(SO/LIC) has policy oversight responsibility for domestic CBRNE CM and is the DOD lead for domestic CBRNE CM interagency coordination.



c. Prior to approving or authorizing DOD forces to deploy, OSD and the Joint Staff will conduct appropriate staff coordination with the lead agency for CM, FEMA.



d. CINCs will coordinate with the Joint Staff during interagency coordination and operations.



11. Releasability. This instruction is approved for limited release. DOD components (to include the combatant commands) and other federal agencies may obtain copies of this instruction through controlled Internet access only (limited to .mil and .gov users) from the CJCS Directives Home Page--http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine. Joint Staff activities may access or obtain copies of this instruction from the Joint Staff LAN.



12. Effective Date. This instruction is effective upon receipt.










HENRY H. SHELTON

Chairman

of the Joint Chiefs of Staff







Enclosures:

A -- Roles and Responsibilities

B -- Interagency Roles and Responsibilities

C -- Authorities and Federal Response Plans

D -- Coordination and Approval Process

E -- Procedures

F -- Considerations

G -- Public Affairs

H -- References

GL -- Glossary


















































(INTENTIONALLY BLANK)













































DISTRIBUTION



Distribution A, B, C, and J plus the following:



Copies



American Red Cross 2

Central Intelligence Agency 2

Department of Agriculture 2

Department of Commerce 2

Department of Education 2

Department of Energy 2

Department of Justice 5

Department of Health and Human Services 2

Department of Housing and Urban Development 2

Department of the Interior 2

Department of Labor 2

Department of State 2

Department of Transportation 2

Department of the Treasury 2

Department of Veterans Affairs 2

Environmental Protection Agency 2

Federal Aviation Administration 2

Federal Bureau of Investigation 5

Federal Communications Commission 2

Federal Emergency Management Agency 10

General Services Administration 2

Interstate Commerce Commission 2

National Communications System 2

National Security Council 2

Nuclear Regulatory Commission 2

Office of Personnel Management 2

Small Business Administration 2

Tennessee Valley Authority 2

US Coast Guard 2

US Secret Service 2

US Postal Service 2














































(INTENTIONALLY BLANK)





ENCLOSURE A



ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES



1. General. The Secretary of Defense and the Deputy Secretary of Defense have the primary responsibility within DOD to provide the overall policy and oversight for MACA in the event of a domestic CBRNE incident. The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the CINCs, the Services, and Defense agencies have important roles regarding military support to domestic CBRNE CM.



2. Specific Responsibilities



a. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations/Low-Intensity Conflict (ASD(SO/LIC)):



(1) Provides civilian oversight for all combating terrorism and domestic CBRNE CM activities. This oversight includes direction and supervision for policy, program planning, execution, and allocation and use of resources for DOD.



(2) Represents the Secretary of Defense on all combating terrorism matters, including CBRNE consequence management, outside the Department.



(3) Serves as the OSD representative to the CSG and the PWMD.



(4) Chairs the DOD Crisis Coordination Group (CCG) and the DOD PWMD.



(5) Provides policy oversight for military installations’ first responders’ CM preparedness.



b. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs (ASD(RA)):



(1) Monitors RC readiness.



(2) In coordination with ASD(SO/LIC), provides policy and program oversight of RC assets designated to respond to domestic CBRNE CM situations.



(3) In coordination with ASD(SO/LIC), Joint Staff, and Services, ensures appropriate Reserve and National Guard forces are integrated into CBRNE CM response efforts.



(4) In coordination with ASD(SO/LIC), reviews PRC procedures and packages for CBRNE CM with the Joint Staff to ensure expeditious and efficient implementation.



c. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs (ASD(HA)):



(1) In coordination with ASD(SO/LIC), assists in developing policy for integrating military medical capability with civilian medical resources responding to a domestic CBRNE situation.



(2) In coordination with ASD(SO/LIC), informs the Joint Staff of any changes to the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS) that would affect CBRNE CM responses.



d. Secretary of the Army has the same responsibility for domestic CBRNE CM as a Secretary of a Military Department who provides support under 10 USC (organize, train, equip, and provide forces). If special management is not necessary, the Secretary of the Army will exercise authority as the DOD Executive Agent through normal DOMS MSCA procedures.



e. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff will:



(1) Serve as the principal military adviser to the Secretary of Defense and the President in preparing for and responding to a CBRNE situation.



(2) Ensure military planning is accomplished to support the lead agency for CBRNE CM, FEMA, in preparing for and responding to a domestic CBRNE situation requiring special management.



(3) Conduct assessments of military installations to ensure that commanders are preparing for, and are able to respond to, a CBRNE situation.



f. Service Chiefs will:



(1) Identify and assign units to USJFCOM that support its role as DOD lead in domestic CBRNE CM, to the greatest extent possible, consistent with
10 USC.



(2) Provide, as directed by the Secretary of Defense, designated forces, to include reserve forces, in order to prepare for and respond to a CBRNE situation. The Service Chiefs are to be prepared to provide support to the supported CINC through the appropriate Service component commanders.



(a) US Army. When directed by the Secretary of Defense, provides forces to furnish assistance to the lead agency for CM, FEMA, as part of the supported regional CINC’s response during a domestic CBRNE CM situation. These forces may be comprised of, but are not limited to, the following:



1. Specialized chemical and biological units.



2. Chemical detachments.



3. Explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) units.



4. Specialized medical units and research capabilities.



5. Military working dogs.



(b) US Navy. When directed by the Secretary of Defense, provides forces to furnish assistance to the lead agency for CM, FEMA, as part of the supported regional CINC’s response during a domestic CBRNE CM situation. These forces may be comprised of, but are not limited to, the following:



1. Specialized environmental and radiological units.



2. EOD units.



3. Military working dogs.



4. Specialized medical units.



5. Medical research capabilities.



(c) US Air Force. When directed by the Secretary of Defense, provides forces to furnish assistance to the lead agency for CM, FEMA, as part of the supported regional CINC’s response during a domestic CBRNE CM situation. These forces may be comprised of, but are not limited to, the following:



1. Biological, chemical, and radiological detection units.



2. Hazardous material (HAZMAT) first responders.



3. EOD units.



4. Military working dogs.



5. Response-tailored specialty medical assets such as aeromedical rapid response units and specialized environmental surveillance assets.



(d) US Marine Corps. When directed by the Secretary of Defense, provides forces to furnish assistance to the lead agency for CM, FEMA, as part of the supported regional CINC’s response during a domestic CBRNE situation. These forces may be comprised of, but are not limited to, specialized chemical and biological units.



g. Director for Intelligence (J-2) will:



(1) Serve as the office of primary responsibility (OPR) for the Joint Staff coordination with the interagency Intelligence Community in support of domestic CBRNE CM matters.



(2) Provide the supported CINC and the Joint Staff with acquired foreign intelligence in support of DOD responses to a CBRNE situation.



h. Director for Operations (J-3) will:



(1) Serve as the Joint Staff OPR for all interagency coordination and guidance for domestic CBRNE CM planning and operational support in response to a CBRNE situation.



(2) Represent the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in interagency working groups concerning domestic CBRNE CM planning, operations, and exercises.



(3) Coordinate with the Services, regional CINCs, and Joint Staff directorates during the development of joint doctrine dealing with domestic CBRNE CM.



(4) Maintain a CJCSI and CONPLAN for domestic CBRNE CM operations.



(5) Coordinate on the development of plans and policies relating to DOD assets involved in domestic CBRNE CM operations.



i. Director for Logistics (J-4) will:



(1) Coordinate on the development of plans and policies relating to DOD assets involved in domestic CBRNE CM operations, with a particular focus on medical, engineering, and transportation assets.



(2) Review the plans and programs of USCINCJFCOM, USCINCPAC, and USCINCSO to determine logistical adequacy and feasibility for domestic CBRNE CM operations within their respective AORs.



j. Director for Strategic Plans and Policy (J-5) will incorporate tasking for domestic CBRNE CM into the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan (JSCP).



k. Director for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (C4) Systems (J-6) will:



(1) Serve as the Joint Staff OPR for C4 interoperability guidance.



(2) Track deployment and readiness status of CJCS-controlled C4 assets.



(3) Coordinate with the Joint Staff, the Services, federal agencies, and the appropriate regional CINCs to develop an interoperable C4 plan.



(4) Review DOD, USCINCJFCOM, USCINPAC, and USCINCSO C4 plans, programs, policies, and assets involved in domestic CBRNE CM operations to determine adequacy, feasibility, consistency with joint doctrine, acceptability, and interoperability with federal agency systems.



l. Director for Operational Plans and Joint Force Development (J-7) will:



(1) Coordinate with the Joint Staff, the Services, and the appropriate regional CINCs to develop joint domestic CBRNE CM doctrine.



(2) Coordinate individual and collective joint CM training with USCINCJFCOM to meet emerging joint domestic CBRNE CM doctrine principles.



(3) Validate emerging domestic CBRNE CM doctrine through joint training events and exercises. Where appropriate, promulgate lessons learned in the Joint Lessons Learned Program (JLLP).



(4) Coordinate the development of Universal Joint Task List (UJTL) tasks, conditions, and measures of effectiveness to reflect all aspects of domestic CBRNE CM operations.

m. Director for Force Structure, Resources, and Assessment (J-8) will coordinate with the Services, supported CINCs, Joint Staff Directorates, and Office of the Under Secretary Defense (Comptroller) (OUSD(C)) to develop cost estimates supporting the development of plans and policies relating to DOD assets involved in domestic CBRNE CM operations.



n. Commander in Chief, US Joint Forces Command (USCINCJFCOM), will:



(1) Develop supporting CM plans to provide military assistance to civil authorities in response to CBRNE situations within the 48 contiguous states and the District of Columbia.



(2) Assume the lead in exercising DOD domestic CBRNE CM capabilities.



(3) Execute joint exercises and training. The Secretary of Defense has designated USCINCJFCOM as the Executive Agent for CM support to CINC exercises. This delegation includes authority to issue directives and order the movement of selected CINC-assigned and participating Service personnel and assets to take part in training and exercises.



(4) Coordinate the development of UJTL tasks, conditions, and measures of effectiveness to reflect all aspects of domestic CBRNE CM operations.



(5) Identify, coordinate resourcing with Service Executive Agent, train, and employ as directed JTF-CS, a command and control (C2) element, capable of planning and integrating DOD's support to the LFA for CBRNE situations in the United States, its territories, and possessions. The JTF-CS:



(a) Serves as the USJFCOM action agent for domestic CBRNE CM operations in support of the LFA. JTF-CS, through USJFCOM, will plan and integrate DOD's CM support to the LFA for CBRNE situations in CONUS. This support will involve capabilities drawn from throughout the Department, including detection, decontamination, medical, and logistical assets.



(b) When directed, accepts Operational Control (OPCON) of designated DOD forces (less designated USSOCOM forces and US Army Corps of Engineers) when the Secretary of Defense approves their use.



(c) Plays a leading role in CM doctrine development, requirements identification, training and exercise management, and the promotion of domestic CBRNE CM interoperability for DOD CBRNE CM-capable assets in the Active and/or Reserve Components.



(d) As directed by USCINCJFCOM, works with the lead agency for CM, FEMA, to develop tailored force CM packages and scenario-based task organizations designed to respond to foreseeable CBRNE situations.



(e) When deployed, operates under the OPCON of the supported regional CINC, depending on the location of the incident (USJFCOM, USPACOM, or USSOUTHCOM).



(f) Develops procedures and plans, in coordination with USPACOM and USSOUTHCOM, for military assistance to civil authorities for CBRNE situations in US territories within their respective AORs.



(g) When coordinated through the appropriate CINCs, Services, and agencies, is authorized direct liaison with DOD CBRNE-capable units for issues related to CBRNE CM information sharing, planning, and interoperability.



o. Commander in Chief, US Pacific Command (USCINCPAC), will:



(1) Develop supporting CM plans for domestic CBRNE situations and CM operations conducted within the US states, territories, and possessions located within the USPACOM AOR.



(2) Identify an organic headquarters element to provide the initial incident response and serve as the initial C2 element for all subsequent DOD support in the domestic area within which the CINC is the supported commander.



(3) Be prepared to accept OPCON of, and employ as required, a JTF in response to domestic CM operations within the US states, territories, and possessions located within the USPACOM AOR.



(4) Exercise domestic CBRNE CM capabilities.



p. Commander in Chief, US Southern Command (USCINCSO), will:



(1) Develop supporting CM plans for domestic CBRNE situations and CM operations conducted within the US territories and possessions located within the USSOUTHCOM AOR.



(2) Identify an organic headquarters element to provide the initial incident response and serve as the initial C2 element in the domestic area within which the CINC is the supported commander.



(3) Be prepared to accept OPCON of, and employ as required, a JTF in response to domestic CM operations within the US territories and possessions located within the USSOUTHCOM AOR.



(4) Exercise domestic CBRNE CM capabilities.



q. Commander in Chief, US Transportation Command (USCINCTRANS), will:



(1) Be prepared to move selected forces and identified elements of other government agencies to support NCA-directed domestic CBRNE CM operations.



(2) Provide liaison officers (LNOs) and other assistance to the supported CINC and FEMA, as required.



r. Commander in Chief, US Special Operations Command (USCINCSOC), will:



(1) When directed, provide special operations forces (SOF) as required in support of the LFA during domestic CBRNE CM operations.



(2) Provide LNOs and other assistance to the supported CINC as required.



s. Director, Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), will:



(1) Provide appropriate intelligence support to DOD leadership and the regional CINCs.



(2) Maintain liaison with non-DOD intelligence agencies.



t. Director, Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), will be prepared to provide command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) support and other support as required.



u. Director, Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), will:



(1) Ensure the supported CINC and supporting commands receive timely and effective logistics support in planning and executing domestic CBRNE CM operations.



(2) Deploy the Contingency Support Team as required.



v. Director, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), will:



(1) Provide modeling, simulation, assessments, analysis, publications, training, and other support as required.



(2) Support CM training exercises, the operational deployments of DOD elements in response to domestic CBRNE situations, and provide expertise in domestic CM to CINCs, joint force commanders, and key DOD components.



(3) Sponsor studies and Advanced Concept Technology Demonstrations (ACTD) to support development and acquisition of CBRNE defense doctrine, training, and equipment.



w. Director, National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA), will provide timely, relevant, and accurate imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial information in support of CBRNE CM operations.



x. Chief, National Guard Bureau (NGB), will:



(1) Monitor and assist the Adjutants General and the State National Guard in providing well-trained and well-equipped Army and Air National Guard forces and resources to provide military support to domestic CM operations in response to a CBRNE situation.



(2) Facilitate and coordinate with the Services and the CINCs National Guard support for contingency operations, special events, and military support to civil authorities.










































(INTENTIONALLY BLANK)





ENCLOSURE B



INTERAGENCY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES



1. General. Many different groups and entities at all levels in the USG are engaged in CBRNE CM policy, programs, and operations. Several federal agencies active in CBRNE CM exercise independent authority to activate a federal field response for their respective AORs. FEMA is the domestic lead agency for CM, including CBRNE. FEMA coordinates with other federal agencies to ensure that domestic CM operations are synchronized with other operations.



2. Agency Responsibilities



a. American Red Cross (ARC). The ARC coordinates federal mass care assistance in support of state and local efforts to meet the needs of victims of a disaster upon activation of the FRP. Assistance will include shelter, feeding, and emergency relief supplies to disaster victims, and the collection of information to operate a Disaster Welfare Information (DWI) system for the purposes of reporting victim status and assisting in family reunification. The ARC independently provides mass care and other services to disaster victims as part of a broad program of disaster relief, as outlined in its charter provisions enacted by the US Congress in 1905.



b. Department of Energy (DOE). DOE will provide emergency responder training for nuclear and radiological incidents. DOE operates a variety of nuclear facilities throughout the United States and maintains radiological emergency response assets specifically organized, trained, and equipped to cope with all forms of radiological accidents and incidents. Through these assets, DOE supports both crisis and consequence management response. With specialized deployable assets, such as those under the Radiological Assistance Program and the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), DOE assists other federal agencies, state, tribal, and local governments responding to nuclear emergencies.



c. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). HHS is the lead agency for planning and preparing for a national response to medical emergencies and will develop metropolitan medical strike teams, now known as the Metropolitan Medical Response System (MMRS), and maintain the NDMS. HHS provides federal support in response to public health and medical care concerns. HHS possesses unique CM capabilities that can be used in a domestic CBRNE CM response, which may include, but are not limited to, agent identification, epidemiological investigation, hazard detection and reduction, decontamination, medical support, and pharmaceutical support operations.



d. Department of Justice/Federal Bureau of Investigation. DOJ, acting through the FBI, is the LFA until the Attorney General transfers the overall LFA role to FEMA. The FBI is the lead agency for crisis management throughout CBRNE situations. The CSG notifies the Attorney General and the Secretary of Treasury when they should designate a National Special Security Event (NSSE). The Attorney General and the Secretary of the Treasury are required to agree on the designation.



e. Department of State (DOS). DOS leads foreign operations and coordinates foreign offers of assistance to domestic operations. If a CBRNE situation occurs along a shared border of the United States and Mexico or Canada, DOS will work with the appropriate agencies to coordinate a USG response.



f. Department of Transportation (DOT). DOT is responsible for coordinating transportation issues in response operations and in restoring the transportation infrastructure after a domestic CBRNE situation. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has the responsibility for the coordination of any law enforcement activity affecting the safety of persons aboard aircraft in flight. The USCG is located within the DOT and provides specialized response capabilities for CM operations. The USCG is a co-chair with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of the National Contingency Plan (NCP), if the incident occurs in areas under USCG jurisdiction. When directed or requested, the Coast Guard may provide assigned forces in response to a domestic CBRNE CM situation. The USCG and Coast Guard personnel possess unique law enforcement authority to establish and enforce security and safety zones and are not subject to the Posse Comitatus Act.



g. Department of Treasury. For NSSEs, the US Secret Service (USSS) is the lead agency for security design/planning and implementation, and will identify and coordinate the appropriate Secret Service and federal antiterrorism measures and counterterrorism assets that will be needed to effect the overall security requirements. The CSG notifies the Attorney General and the Secretary of Treasury when they should designate an NSSE. The Attorney General and the Secretary of the Treasury are required to agree on the designation.



h. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The VA will conduct assessments of medical assistance available to support a CBRNE situation. Additionally, the VA will coordinate with the NDMS.



i. Environmental Protection Agency. The EPA responds to actual or potential releases of hazardous materials. Under the NCP, the EPA designates a Federal On-Scene Coordinator for an incident. The EPA is the National Chair of the National Response Team (NRT), a multiagency committee that provides technical expertise and advises in HAZMAT planning and response. Federal response may include, but is not limited to, agent identification, hazard detection and reduction, environmental monitoring, decontamination, and long-term site restoration. The EPA established the Radiological Emergency Response Team (ERT) to support its response to incidents involving radioactive materials. Under the FRP, the EPA is the lead agency for ESF-10, Hazardous Materials. EPA also provides emergency responder training for HAZMATs and environmental materials to meet its broad environmental mission.



j. Federal Emergency Management Agency. FEMA is the lead agency for domestic CBRNE CM situations. FEMA uses the existing FRP structure to manage and coordinate the federal response to consequences of terrorism, including the consequences of a CBRNE situation. Figure B-1 outlines the functions and primary agencies designated in the FRP. DOD may be a support agency to all emergency support functions (ESFs).





EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION PRIMARY AGENCY
#1 Transportation Department of Transportation
#2 Communications National Communications System
#3 Public Works and Engineering Department of Defense, US Army Corps of Engineers
#4 Firefighting Department of Agriculture, Forest Service
#5 Information and Planning Federal Emergency Management Agency
#6 Mass Care American Red Cross
#7 Resource Support General Services Administration
#8 Health and Medical Services Department of Health and Human Services
#9 Urban Search and Rescue Federal Emergency Management Agency
#10 Hazardous Material Environmental Protection Agency
#11 Food Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service
#12 Energy Department of Energy



Figure B-1. FRP Emergency Support Functions and Primary Agencies










































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ENCLOSURE C



AUTHORITIES AND FEDERAL RESPONSE PLANS



1. External Authorities. Several documents provide authority and guidance for DOD assistance to civil authorities. Additionally, many federal departments and agencies have developed response and contingency plans to coordinate activities and to successfully execute a cohesive, integrated response operation to domestic CBRNE CM operations. A brief summary of these authorities and plans is provided.



a. PDD-39. PDD-39, “US Policy on Counterterrorism (U),” validates and reaffirms the DOJ, acting through the FBI, as the overall LFA and lead agency for crisis management and FEMA as the domestic lead agency for CM.



b. PDD-62. PDD-62, “Protection Against Unconventional Threats to the Homeland and Americans Overseas (U),” reaffirms the domestic lead agencies and their responsibilities. Additionally, it outlines the roles and responsibilities of other federal agencies, including Public Health Service (PHS) (health/
medical), EPA (HAZMAT/environmental) and DOE (radiological). PDD-62 identifies lead agency responsibilities with regard to an NSSE. The FBI is the lead agency for crisis management, intelligence, and federal criminal investigation. The USSS is the lead agency for security design/planning and implementation. FEMA is the lead agency for CM. Other departments, such as Defense, State, Energy, Health and Human Services, Transportation, and the EPA, may provide specialized resources in support of these crisis management, security, and CM efforts.



c. Federal Response Plan



(1) Basic Plan. The FRP provides the mechanism for coordinating delivery of federal assistance and resources to augment efforts of state and local governments overwhelmed by a major disaster or emergency. The FRP implements the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act in order to provide assistance to save lives; protect public health, safety, and property; alleviate damage and hardship; and reduce future vulnerability. The FRP organizes the federal response into 12 ESFs and the primary agencies responsible for each ESF. The FRP signatories support FEMA for CM through their response to CBRNE situations. FEMA coordinates with other federal agencies to ensure that domestic CM operations are synchronized with other operations. FEMA publishes the FRP.



(2) Terrorism Incident Annex. The Terrorism Incident Annex ensures that the FRP is adequate to respond to the consequences of terrorism within the United States. The Terrorism Incident Annex addresses potential CBRNE CM requirements to support crisis management, responsibilities of various federal agencies, and funding guidelines.



d. National Contingency Plan. The NCP provides the organizational structure, procedures, and authority for the Federal Government to respond to discharges of oil and releases of hazardous substances, pollutants, and contaminants, including radiological, chemical, and biological agents. The EPA and the USCG have the responsibility for the NCP. The NCP may be activated in the initial stages of a CBRNE situation, especially when the nature of the agent is unknown. ESF #10, Hazardous Materials, places the response mechanisms of the NCP within the FRP coordination structure when both plans are implemented concurrently. The EPA publishes the NCP.



e. Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP). The FRERP provides structure for the Federal Government to respond to peacetime radiological incidents and accidents in order to provide assistance to save lives and protect public health, safety, and property. The FRP Terrorism Incident Annex and Base Plan places the response mechanisms of the FRERP within the FRP coordination structure when both plans are implemented concurrently for deliberate or inadvertent CBRNE CM. FEMA publishes the FRERP.



f. USG Interagency Domestic Terrorism Concept of Operations Plan (USG CONPLAN). The USG CONPLAN provides overall guidance to federal, state, and local agencies concerning how the Federal Government would respond to a potential or actual terrorist threat or incident that occurs in the United States, particularly one involving WMD.



g. Guidelines for the Mobilization, Deployment, and Employment of US Government Agency in Response to a Domestic Threat of Incident. The Domestic Guidelines is a classified document addressing the guidelines for the mobilization, deployment, and employment of USG agencies in response to a domestic threat or terrorist incident. The PDD-39 Domestic Guidelines assigns specific responsibilities to DOJ, FBI, DOD, FEMA, DOE, EPA, and HHS. These guidelines are designed to facilitate and enhance USG interagency coordination to effectively respond to potential or actual domestic terrorism. As the overall LFA for response to threats or acts of terrorism inside the United States, DOJ, acting through the FBI, is supported by FEMA and other federal agencies. The FBI is the lead agency for formulating and executing a crisis management response. FEMA is the lead agency for formulating and executing a Federal CM response in support of state and local governments.




2. Internal



a. Unified Command Plan (UCP)-99. The UCP is the document approved by the President that sets forth basic guidance to all unified combatant commanders. It establishes their missions, responsibilities, and force structure; delineates the general geographic AOR for geographic combatant commanders; and specifies functional responsibilities for functional combatant commanders. It is submitted by the Secretary of Defense to the President every 2 years. UCP-99, approved by the President on 29 September 1999, tasks USCINCJFCOM with the responsibility for “providing, within CONUS, military assistance to civil authorities (including consequence management operations in response to nuclear, radiological, chemical, or biological weapons of mass destruction incidents) . . . subject to Secretary of Defense approval.”



b. On 13 September 1999, the Secretary of Defense forwarded to the President UCP-99 with amplification, which directed USCINCJFCOM to establish the JTF-CS to serve as the primary DOD command element for the planning and execution of military assistance to civil authorities for domestic CM operations as a result of a CBRNE situation.










































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ENCLOSURE D



COORDINATION AND APPROVAL PROCESS



1. Purpose. The following procedures provide CJCS guidance for the coordination and approval of operational deployments of DOD forces or individuals in support of an LFA request for assistance during a CBRNE situation.



2. Scope. The sensitivity of DOD CM missions and capabilities requires clear and concise procedures for domestic movements of individuals and units. Approval procedures must ensure that proper civilian oversight through ASD(SO/LIC) and the required interagency coordination are accomplished; all appropriate Services, agencies, and organizations are kept informed; and Operational Security (OPSEC) is maintained. This includes coordination with the regional CINC prior to deployment of personnel, units, or equipment.



3. Operational Deployments. Approval procedures for the deployment of DOD forces or individuals in support of contingency or other tasked CM operations are contained in CJCS CONPLAN 0500; regional CINCs supporting CONPLANs; or SECDEF-authorized warning, alert, deployment, or execute orders.



a. CINC Liaison Officers. Upon notification that a CBRNE event has occurred that may require DOD assistance, the affected geographic CINC may send LNOs to the appropriate operations centers to gain situational awareness. However, LNOs cannot obligate DOD resources or commence CBRNE CM support operations without proper authority.



b. Federal Request for DOD CBRNE CM Support. It is clear that certain CBRNE situations may be qualitatively and quantitatively different than other situations that may require DOD support to civil authorities, and therefore, the DOD response would require special management procedures and channels. All official requests for DOD support for a CBRNE situation enter through the DOD Executive Secretary. The Deputy Secretary of Defense will decide whether or not the situation warrants special management. If special management is required for a domestic CBRNE situation, the Joint Staff, J-33 Joint Operations Division (JOD), is the OPR and forwards orders to the appropriate CINC under the policy oversight of ASD(SO/LIC). If special operational management is not warranted, the Secretary of the Army DOMS is the OPR and forwards orders to the appropriate CINC.



c. Defense Coordinating Officer (DCO). A DCO may be the first DOD representative on site and is the single DOD point of contact. The DCO is the designated DOD on-scene member of the FEMA-led ERT. The DCO coordinates all requests for assistance with the Federal Coordinating Officer (FCO) or designated representative. The DCO is supported by a Defense Coordinating Element (DCE). Although the DCO may be supplanted by the JTF commander as the senior DOD representative, the DCO will continue to exercise the ERT staff function of mission assignment coordination and validation, and will act as a liaison between the ERT staff and the JTF staff.



d. Command of Forces. When directed, the commander of the JTF (or other appropriate C2 headquarters as determined by the supported CINC) accepts OPCON of designated DOD forces (less USSOCOM and US Army Corps of Engineers), including DCO, DCE, and Emergency Preparedness Liaison Officers (EPLOs).



e. DOD Personnel Accountability. Because of the inherent risk associated with working in a CBRNE environment and the potential for long-term health issues associated with exposure to CBRNE contaminants, strict accountability of all DOD personnel in the vicinity of the incident site is needed. Military commanders must establish adequate controls to account for and maintain records on all DOD personnel entering and departing the affected area.









ENCLOSURE E



PROCEDURES



1. Relationship Between DOD Units Responding to CBRNE Situations and Other Organizations During Times of Deployment



a. DOD Deployed Headquarters. For domestic CBRNE CM situations requiring special management, the commander of the responding headquarters reports to the Secretary of Defense through his respective regional CINC and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.



b. Lead Federal Agency. The commander of the deployed CBRNE CM headquarters operates in support of the overall LFA through direct support of the lead agency for CM. With the FRP activated, FEMA coordinates with other federal agencies to ensure that domestic CM operations are synchronized with other operations. The commander of the deployed headquarters will supplant the DCO as the senior DOD representative and will keep higher headquarters informed. However, the DCO will continue to exercise the ERT staff function of mission assignment coordination and validation and act as liaison between the ERT staff and the JTF staff.



2. Operations Security



a. Federal, state, and local agencies conduct CM operations in an unclassified forum. The Department of Defense will be an active participant in the unclassified forum to ensure consistency and expeditious flow of information. Whenever joint special operations task forces (JSOTFs) are employed, their employment will be protected in accordance with established procedures and security classification guidelines.



b. Information on DOD CBRNE CM operations will be made public as necessary. The Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs (OSD(PA)) is the point of contact for all media inquiries relating to DOD participation in CBRNE CM activities.



3. Fiscal Arrangements. Funding of DOD units participating in CBRNE CM support to other government agencies will be in accordance with law and within the established procedures in PDD-39, PDD-62, DOD Directives, and the FRP. If the President invokes the Stafford Act, FEMA issues mission assignments through the FRP. Each DOD component is responsible for capturing and reporting incremental costs to Service/defense agency comptrollers. All incremental DOD costs should be captured by providers of support for reimbursement by the supported agency. Standard interagency billing procedures should be followed.

4. Public Affairs (PA)



a. OSD(PA) is the lead for releasing public information concerning DOD. This would continue to be the case during a CBRNE situation.



b. PA guidance during a domestic CBRNE CM operation must be coordinated with the LFA and the lead agencies for crisis and consequence management.



5. Use of Weapons



a. Units may deploy to sites of CBRNE situations with their weapons in storage in the event that the unit is subsequently authorized to carry arms by the Secretary of Defense or is deployed from the CBRNE site to an assignment where weapons are authorized. The military on-scene commander is responsible to ensure that weapons and ammunition are adequately stored and physically secured at the site of the CBRNE situation.



b. Military members providing security for stored weapons and ammunition at military facilities during CM support operations may carry their weapons while performing their normal security duties and will adhere to the rules on the use of force set forth in Annex C, Appendix 6, CJCS CONPLAN 0500-98.



c. There is a presumption that units deployed to sites of CBRNE situations will not carry arms. In an emergency situation and then only when expressly authorized by the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Attorney General, units providing CM support may be authorized to carry arms. When weapons are authorized, units will adhere to the rules on the use of force set forth in Annex C, Appendix 6, CJCS CONPLAN 0500-98.



6. Use of Force in Self-Defense. The responsibility for providing security for DOD personnel, equipment, and military sites during CM operations rests with local law enforcement authorities. DOD personnel, however, retain the right to take appropriate actions in self-defense if threatened during CM operations. If feasible, DOD personnel should request civilian law enforcement assistance before acting in self-defense.









ENCLOSURE F



CONSIDERATIONS



1. Intelligence. In a domestic CBRNE CM situation, DOD has no authority or responsibility for the collection of intelligence domestically. Moreover, in the context of a terrorist threat or acts of terrorism, the FBI, as the LFA, has the overall responsibility for assembling, analyzing, and disseminating intelligence, whether of domestic or foreign origin, on the operating environment.



2. Information. The LFA has the overall responsibility for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of information on the operating environment. Information relevant to CM operations will be provided to DOD from the LFA or lead agency for CM. The on-scene military commander may request information from the LFA channels to fulfill his specific requirements.



3. Availability and Timeliness of CBRNE CM Capabilities. DOD units possess capabilities that can provide CBRNE CM assistance during a domestic CBRNE situation. However, response times and resources vary. Additionally, several of these units may be committed already to potential or current worldwide military operations. Based on adjusted priorities, the NCA could redirect these units to domestic CBRNE CM operations. The required time to disengage and redeploy the units and the impact on ongoing military operations are key planning considerations.



4. Media Impact. The media will play an important role in reporting and shaping public opinion concerning a CBRNE situation and CM response operations. Any DOD response must take into account possible media repercussions. DOJ/FBI is the lead agency for PA guidance in the crisis management phase. FEMA is the lead agency for PA guidance for CM. The LFA Joint Information Center (JIC) will provide information to the media. OASD(PA) is the point of contact for all media inquiries concerning DOD support to the LFA. See Enclosure G.



5. Medical. During a CBRNE situation, medical and public health needs will be significant factors. NDMS, which includes DOD coordination of participating nonfederal-fixed hospitals and DOD-provided patient evacuation, is the primary federal-level medical response element. Other DOD medical capabilities external to NDMS could be requested if it is determined necessary to augment or sustain the NDMS/local response in order to save lives and minimize human suffering.



6. Domestic Transportation Assets. Transportation of DOD and other federal personnel and assets to a domestic CBRNE situation will be critical to a successful response. DOD transportation assets are in high demand and require planning time. All transportation modes should be considered to support domestic CM operations. Unlike overseas deployments, ground transportation may be a viable option for CONUS situations. Under FRP ESF #1, Transportation, the DOT’s Movement Coordination Center will coordinate deployment of federal resources, including DOD resources, to support CBRNE CM operations.



7. Reserve Component Forces. RC forces are capable of conducting a wide range of domestic CBRNE CM operations. They are geographically dispersed throughout the United States and, therefore, may provide the most timely response to a CBRNE situation. RC forces may be involuntarily ordered to active duty for a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear situation. The timeline associated with RC call-up or mobilization is a key planning consideration.



8. Presidential Declaration. Until a Presidential Declaration is issued, federal agencies respond using their individual authorities and funding sources. Pursuant to the Stafford Act and a declaration of an emergency, the Department of Defense may be reimbursed for its assistance to FEMA and FRP operations.



9. Law Enforcement Activities. Military members supporting CBRNE CM operations will neither engage in civilian law enforcement activities nor act as law enforcement agents.







ENCLOSURE G



PUBLIC AFFAIRS



1. General. A threat or act of terrorism involving a CBRNE may produce major consequences that could overwhelm the capabilities of many local and state governments, as well as the existing capabilities of the Federal Government. DOD has certain responsibilities for training and supporting civilian authorities' efforts to respond to a terrorist attack involving the use of CBRNE.



2. This PA guidance contains policy-level guidance for use by commanders, public affairs officers, and spokespersons participating in domestic CBRNE CM responses and exercises with federal, state, and local civilian authorities.



3. General Guidance



a. DOD PA activities during domestic CBRNE CM situations are driven by the supported federal, state, or local authorities. For example, the PA posture; location of JICs; along with the time, place, and method of communicating with the media, will normally be driven by the supported civilian authority. PA for a CBRNE situation will be coordinated by the LFA. OSD(PA) is the PA focal point for the Department of Defense. The Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (Public Affairs) will coordinate with OSD(PA).



b. In every instance, PA personnel will ensure proper contingency planning and coordination are accomplished in anticipation of potential real-world CBRNE response requirements and associated training activities. PA personnel must make accommodation for, and interact with, local, state, national, and international media. The responsible PA element must plan and execute appropriately.



c. The supported CINC, component, or Service commander, as applicable, will have responsibility for PA planning and execution.



d. PA guidance for CBRNE CM response contingencies will be developed and staffed in accordance with applicable DOD Directives. PA guidance will include, at a minimum, statements and questions/answers for use in response to queries. PA guidance should also include details regarding PA architecture and plans for participation in JICs.



e. Whenever JSOTFs are employed, their employment will be protected in accordance with established procedures and security classification guidelines.



4. Questions beyond the scope of this guidance will be forwarded through PA channels to OSD(PA).

5. OSD(PA) POC for plans may be contacted at (703) 693-1074; DSN:
223-1074. OSD(PA) POC for media may be contacted at (703) 697-4162;
DSN: 227-4162.









ENCLOSURE H



REFERENCES



a. CJCSI 3214.01, 30 June 1998, “Military Support to Foreign Consequence Management Operations”



b. CONPLAN 0400-96, 31 May 1996, “Counterproliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction”



c. Presidential Decision Directive/NSC-39, 21 June 1995, “U.S. Policy on Counterterrorism”



d. Presidential Decision Directive/NSC-62, 22 May 1998, “Protection Against Unconventional Threats to the Homeland and Americans Overseas”



e. Federal Emergency Management Agency, 9230-1-PL, April 1999, Federal Response Plan (FRP), with Terrorism Incident Annex



f. Title 42, United States Code, sections 5121 et seq, “The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act” as amended (referred to herein as “the Stafford Act”)



g. Environmental Protection Agency, September 1994, “National Contingency Plan”



h. Federal Emergency Management Agency, 1 May 1996, “Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan”



i. Federal Bureau of Investigation, 16 January 2001, “USG Interagency Domestic Terrorism Concept of Operations Plan”


j. Unified Command Plan, 29 September 1999, with Secretary of Defense,
13 September 1999, cover memorandum to the President of the United
States



k. SecDef memorandum, 1 April 2000, “Consequence Management Responsibilities Within the Department of Defense for Incidents Involving Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and High-Yield Explosives (CBRNE-CM)”



l. SecDef memorandum, 10 August 2000, “Management of DOD Operational Response to the Consequences of Certain Incidents Involving Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and High-Yield Explosives”



m. SecDef memorandum, 9 May 2001, “Civilian Oversight of DoD Combating Terrorism and Consequence Management Activities”



n. DOD Directive 3025.1, 15 January 1993, “Military Support to Civil Authorities”



o. DOD Directive 3025.12, 4 February 1994, “Military Assistance for Civil Disturbances (MACDIS)”



p. DOD Directive 3025.13, 13 September 1985, “Employment of DOD Resources in Support of the United States Secret Service”



q. DOD Directive 3025.15, 18 February 1997, “Military Assistance to Civil Authorities”



r. DOD Directive 3150.5, 24 March 1987, “DOD Response to an Improvised Nuclear Device Incident”



s. DOD Directive 5400.13, 9 January 1996, “Joint Public Affairs Operations”



t. DOD Directive 6000.12, 29 April 1996, “Health Services Operations and Readiness”



u. DOD Instruction 5400.14, 22 January 1996, “Procedures for Joint Public Affairs Operations”



v. SecDef message 211644Z APR 99, “Public Affairs Guidance - Counter-terrorism/Special Mission Units”



w. SecDef message 112005Z MAR 98, “Public Affairs Guidance for National Guard and Reserve Component Integration into Domestic Preparedness Program”



x. DepSecDef memorandum, 23 November 1996, “Executive Agency for the Domestic Preparedness Program”



y. CJCSM 3122.03A, 31 December 1999, “Joint Operations Planning and Execution System, Vol. II (Planning and Execution Formats and Guidance)”



z. CJCSI 5113.02A, 10 August 2000, “CJCS Counterproliferation Charter”



aa. Joint Pub 3-11, 11 July 2000, “Joint Doctrine for Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical (NBC) Environments”



bb. Joint Pub 3-08, 1 February 1995, “Interagency Coordination During Joint Operations”



cc. Joint Pub 3-07.2, 17 March 1998, “Joint Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Antiterrorism”



dd. Joint Pub 3-61, 14 May 1997, “Doctrine for Public Affairs in Joint Operations”



ee. Joint Pub 3-07.7, 3 July 2000, “Joint Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Domestic Support Operations (DRAFT)”



ff. Public Law 104-201, Defense Against Weapons of Mass Destruction.



gg. DOD Directive 5160.62, 26 April 1989, “Single Manager for Military Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology and Training (EODT&T)”



hh. Department of Justice, 8 August 2000, “Guidelines for the Mobilization, Deployment, and Employment of U.S. Government Agencies in Response to a Domestic Threat or Incident of Terrorism in Accordance with Presidential Decision Directive 39”












































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GLOSSARY



PART I -- ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS



ACTD Advanced Concept Technology Demonstrations

AOR area of responsibility

ARC American Red Cross

ASD(HA) Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs)

ASD(RA) Assistant Secretary of Defense (Reserve Affairs)

ASD(SO/LIC) Assistant Secretary of Defense (Special
Operations/Low-Intensity Conflict)



C2 command and control

C4 command, control, communications, and computers

C4I command, control, communications, computers, and
intelligence

CBRNE chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-
yield explosive

CCG Crisis Coordination Group

CDRG Catastrophic Disaster Response Group

CINC commander in chief

CJCS Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

CJCSI Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Instruction

CM consequence management

CONPLAN Contingency Plan

CONUS Continental United States

CSG Counterterrorism and Security Group



DCE Defense Coordinating Element

DCO Defense Coordinating Officer

DepSecDef Deputy Secretary of Defense

DEST Domestic Emergency Support Team

DIA Defense Intelligence Agency

DISA Defense Information Services Agency

DLA Defense Logistics Agency

DOD Department of Defense

DOE Department of Energy

DOJ Department of Justice

DOMS Director of Military Support

DOS Department of State

DOT Department of Transportation

DTRA Defense Threat Reduction Agency

DWI disaster welfare information



EOD explosive ordnance disposal

EPA Environmental Protection Agency

EPLO Emergency Preparedness Liaison Officer

ERT Emergency Response Team

ESF emergency support function

EST Emergency Support Team



FAA Federal Aviation Administration

FBI Federal Bureau of Investigation

FCO Federal Coordinating Officer

FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency

FRERP Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan

FRMAC Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment
Center

FRP Federal Response Plan



HAZMAT hazardous material

HHS Department of Health and Human Services



IWG Interagency Working Group



JIC Joint Information Center

JLLP Joint Lessons Learned Program

JOD Joint Operations Division

JSCP Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan

JSOTF joint special operations task forces

JTF joint task force

JTF-CS Joint Task Force-Civil Support



LAN local area network

LFA lead federal agency

LNO liaison officer



MACA military assistance to civilian authorities

MACDIS military assistance to civil disturbances

MMRS Metropolitan Medical Response System

MSCA military support to civilian authorities



NCA National Command Authorities

NCP National Contingency Plan

NDMS National Disaster Medical System

NGB National Guard Bureau

NIMA National Imagery and Mapping Agency

NRT National Response Team

NSA National Security Administration

NSC National Security Council

NSSE National Special Security Event



OCJCS(PA) Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
(Public Affairs)

OPCON operational control

OPR office of primary responsibility

OPSEC operational security

OSD Office of the Secretary of Defense

OSD(PA) Office of the Secretary of Defense - Public Affairs

OUSD(C) Office of the Under Secretary of Defense - Comptroller



PA Public Affairs

PDD Presidential Decision Directive

PHS Public Health Service

PRC Presidential Reserve Call-Up

PWMD Preparedness and Weapons of Mass Destruction
Group



RC Reserve Component



SECDEF Secretary of Defense

SOF special operations forces



UCP Unified Command Plan

UJTL Universal Joint Task List

USC United States Code

USCG United States Coast Guard

USCINCJFCOM Commander in Chief, US Joint Forces Command

USCINCPAC Commander in Chief, US Pacific Command

USCINCSO Commander in Chief, US Southern Command

USCINCSOC Commander in Chief, US Special Operations
Command

USCINCTRANS Commander in Chief, US Transportation Command

USG United States Government

USJFCOM United States Joint Forces Command

USPACOM United States Pacific Command

USSOCOM United States Special Operations Command

USSOUTHCOM United States Southern Command

USSS United States Secret Service



VA Department of Veterans Affairs



WMD weapons of mass destruction

WMD-CST Weapons of Mass Destruction - Civil Support Team






PART II -- TERMS AND DEFINITIONS



1. area of responsibility (AOR). The geographic area associated with a regional CINC within which a regional CINC has authority to plan and conduct operations.



2. biological agent. A microorganism or byproduct that causes disease in personnel, plants, or animals or causes the contamination or deterioration of material.



3. Catastrophic Disaster Response Group (CDRG). The CDRG was established by the Federal Response Plan as the interagency forum to direct planning, operations, and exercises for the FRP community. FEMA chairs the CDRG meetings among the FRP departments and agencies.



4. chemical agent. A chemical substance that is intended to kill, seriously injure, or incapacitate people through its physiological effects. The term excludes riot agents, herbicides, smoke, and flame.



5. Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and High-Yield Explosive (CBRNE) - Consequence Management (CM). The consequence management activities for all deliberate and inadvertent releases of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosives with potential to cause high casualties and large levels of destruction.



6. Consequence Management (CM). Consequence management is defined as measures to protect public health and safety, restore essential government services, and provide emergency relief to governments, businesses, and individuals affected by the consequences of a CBRNE situation. The primary authority rests with the states to respond, and the Federal Government to provide assistance as required.



7. Crisis Coordination Group (CCG). The CCG is an internal DOD working group that plans for and/or responds to a possible or actual terrorist incident.



8. Crisis Management. Crisis Management includes measures to identify, acquire, and plan the use of resources needed to anticipate, prevent, and resolve a threat or act of terrorism. Crisis Management is predominantly a law enforcement function in domestic situations.



9. Counterterrorism and Security Group (CSG). The CSG is the interagency forum for domestic and foreign terrorism. The NSC National

Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counterterrorism normally chairs the CSG. The FBI will chair the CSG when the CSG considers requests for the DEST in response to a domestic or unknown terrorist group. The CSG includes appropriate interagency members and reports to the Deputies Committee (or at the call of its chair, the Principals Committee).



10. Defense Coordinating Officer (DCO). The DCO is the DOD on-scene representative who coordinates requirements with the Federal Coordinating Officer (FCO) or designated representative. The DCO validates requests by the FCO, passing requirements back to the CINC or JTF.



11. domestic. The continental United States (CONUS) (including the District of Columbia), Alaska, Hawaii, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, or any political subdivision thereof. Two former trust territories (but now independent countries) also are deemed eligible assistance under the Compact of Free Association -- the Republic of the Marshall Islands (until 21 October 2001) and the Federated States of Micronesia (until 3 November 2001).



12. Emergency Response Team (ERT). The main ERT is an interagency team, consisting of the lead representative from each federal department or agency assigned primary responsibility for an ESF and key members of the FCO’s staff. ERT elements may operate from several field locations as required.



13. Emergency Support Team (EST). The interagency group comprised of representatives from each of the primary agencies, select support agencies, and FEMA headquarters staff. It operates from the FEMA National Interagency Emergency Operations Center in Washington, DC.



14. Executive Agent. The individual designated by position to have and exercise the assigned responsibility and delegated authority of the Secretary of Defense.



15. Federal Coordinating Officer (FCO). The FCO, or designated representative, is the focal point for DOD liaison with FEMA during CM operations. The FCO is appointed by the Director of FEMA, on behalf of the President, to coordinate Federal CM operations in the field. The source and level of the FCO will likely depend on the nature of the incident.



16. high-yield explosive. Any conventional weapon or device that is capable of a high order of destruction and/or of being used in such a manner as to kill or injure large numbers of people.



17. Immediate Response. Any form of immediate action taken by a DOD component or military commander to assist civil authorities to save lives, prevent human suffering, or mitigate great property damage under imminently serious conditions and when time does not permit approval from a higher authority.



18. lead agency. The federal department or agency assigned lead responsibility to manage and coordinate the federal response in a specific functional area. The FBI is the lead agency for crisis management and FEMA is the lead agency for consequence management. Lead agencies support the overall LFA during all phases of the response.



19. lead federal agency (LFA). The federal agency that leads and coordinates the overall federal response is referred to as the LFA and is determined by the type of emergency. Specific responsibilities of an LFA vary according to the agency's unique statutory authorities.



20. Military Assistance to Civil Authorities (MACA). Those DOD activities and measures covered under MSCA (natural and manmade disasters) plus DOD assistance for civil disturbances, counterdrug, sensitive support, counterterrorism, and law enforcement.



21. Military Support to Civil Authorities (MSCA). Those activities and measures taken by the DOD components to foster mutual assistance and support between DOD and any civilian government agency in planning, preparing for, or responding to, the consequences of civil emergencies or attacks.



22. National Disaster Medical System (NDMS). NDMS is a nationwide medical mutual aid network between the federal and nonfederal sectors that includes medical response, patient evacuation, and definitive medical care. At the federal level, it is a partnership between HHS, DOD, Department of Veterans Affairs, and FEMA.



23. National Special Security Event (NSSE). Events designated upon the approval of the Attorney General and the Secretary of the Treasury which DOD and other government agencies may be requested to preposition forces. The forces requested may be units with CM capabilities in anticipation of a potential CBRNE situation.



24. Preparedness and Weapons of Mass Destruction (PWMD) Group. The PWMD Group, formerly WMDP under PDD-62, is an interagency forum to discuss policies and programs related to WMD issues. The NSC National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counter-terrorism chairs the PWMD Group.



25. Presidential Declaration. Under the Stafford Act, a Governor may request the President to declare a major disaster or emergency if an event is beyond the combined response capabilities of the affected local and state governments. Based on the findings of a joint federal-state-local preliminary damage assessment (PDA) indicating the damages are of sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant assistance under the Act, the President may grant a major disaster or emergency declaration. (Note: In a particularly fast-moving or devastating disaster, the PDA process may be deferred until after the declaration.) If an emergency involves an area or facility for which the Federal Government exercises exclusive or preeminent responsibility and authority, the President may unilaterally direct the provision of emergency assistance under the Stafford Act. The Governor of the affected state will be consulted if possible.



26. primary agency. A primary agency, as stated in the FRP, is responsible for coordinating an ESF. A primary agency is designated on the basis of its authorities, resources, and capabilities in that functional area.



27. routine operations. Day-to-day operations, training, actions, and plans conducted when not conducting CM operations.



28. support agency. A support agency assists the primary agency in resolving the requirements of an ESF.



29. supported CINC. The regional CINC designated by the NCA to exercise operational control of DOD forces providing CM support to the LFA.



30. supporting CINC. Any regional or functional CINC providing forces, equipment, or any other resources to the supported CINC for domestic CM.



31. weapons of mass destruction (WMD)



(1) Under 10 USC 1403, a WMD is any weapon or device that is intended, or has the capability, to cause death or serious bodily injury to a significant number of people through the release, dissemination, or impact of toxic or poisonous chemicals or their precursors; a disease organism; or radiation or radioactivity.



(2) 18 USC 2332a, defines a WMD as (1) any destructive device as defined in section of 921 of this title, [which states] any explosive, incendiary, or poison gas, bomb, grenade, rocket having a propellant charge of more than 4 ounces, missile having an explosive or incendiary charge of more than one-quarter ounce, mine, or device similar to the above; (2) any weapon that is designed or intended to cause death or serious bodily injury through the release, dissemination, or impact of toxic or poisonous chemicals or their precursors; (3) any weapon involving a disease organism; or (4) any weapon that is designed to release radiation or radioactivity at a level dangerous to human life.



(3) For the purpose of military support to domestic CBRNE CM operations, the term WMD shall be defined as either a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, or high-yield explosive weapon, device or material. CBRNE includes any event, industrial accident, act of nature, act of war, or terrorism. WMD refers to a CBRNE device specifically designed to produce casualties.



32. Weapons of Mass Destruction - Civil Support Team (WMD-CST). WMD-CSTs are joint Army and Air National Guard teams that provide chemical, biological, and radiological initial survey and assessment operations for domestic WMD incidents. The WMD-CSTs are staffed fulltime with Active Guard/Reserve members from the National Guard. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1999, the Department of Defense established WMD-CSTs to support civil authorities in managing the consequences of a CBRNE situation. The WMD-CST deploys to an area of operations, assesses a suspected CBRNE situation in support of a local incident commander, and advises civilian responders regarding appropriate action.

Monday, August 21, 2006

Sorry Google and thanks to webcitation.org

Sorry about screenshotting your cache here Google... Any questions on it, please refer to my Fair Use Notice posting

And a shout out to my newly discovered helpful friend WebCite. A great tool for documentation without the worrisome problems that 404s create. I only wish I had known about it when I began this project!

The following screenshots are from the cached page of a story which I referenced in my last post which is now 404. Surprise, surprise, right?